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% of the boat. the government agrees -- there's a lot, under greek law whatever party comes in first, take a step back, greece has proportional representation that deserves a word of comment. proportional representation is the peculiar idea that if you get a certain percentage of the vote in an election, you should have the same percentage of delegates in congress that right the laws. it you didn't do that you exclude the 18% that had a role to play in governing which you think is the idea. in european countries we have proportional representation. if you get more than usually a cut off of 5% to get whatever the percentage of your vote is that is how many seats you get. you all understand i assume we don't do that in united states. if you get 51% of the vote you get it all and 49% wage. we have had proportional representation in the united states in the past. when you read about primary, and they a gets 20 delegates for the convention and candidate b, that is proportional, they get an equal number of delegates, we actually recognized in the united states proportional representation, we jus
," law represent pew boy examines haiti's history. david talbot presents a history of san francisco in the 1970s in "season of the witch: enchantment, terror and deliverance in the city of love." in "quiet: the power of introverts in a world that can't stop talking," author susan cain examines the benefits of an introverted personality. david drayly looks at 1862 and the actions of abraham lincoln in "rise to greatness: abraham lincoln's most perilous year." and in "full body burden: growing up in the nuclear shadow of rocky flats," kristin iverson investigates the nuclear weapons plant that was located near her childhood home. for an extended list of links to various publications' book selections, visit booktv's web site, booktv.org or facebook.com/booktv. >> and another update from capitol hill as reporters wait here for word from lawmakerrers in closed-door meetings on the fiscal cliff. an update via twitter from chad pilgrim of fox news, reid's remark that he had made a counteroffer was off-the-cuff response and that there was no counteroffer, and "the washington post" quoting s
causes people to drive more. there's something called the fundamental law of traffic congestion that establishes that vehicle miles traveled increase roughly one for one with highway miles built. if you build it, they will drive, okay? the only way to make sure that our city streets are moved sufficiently is to charge people for it, to actually do what singapore does, second densest country in the world, and yet you can drive around it effortlylessly because they have that electronic road pricing thing that charges you for using these streets. america's cities are running, essentially, a soviet-style urban transit policy. they used to have grocery stores that would give away eggs and butter at far below market prices, the result was you couldn't get the goods. that's what we do with our city streets. they're a valuable commodity, and as a result, they're the urban equivalent of long lines which are traffic jams. there's no path other than actually making people pay for the cost of their actions. now, we already, of course, pay plenty, and one of the enduring challenges of cities
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3